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NSRL ICCHIBAN Experiment Protocol

ICCHIBAN Working Group
28 July 2004


The NSRL ICCHIBAN Experiment, dedicated to the intercomparision of the response of both active and passive dosimeters used in monitoring exposure to space radiation, is schedule for 25-28 September 2004 at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York. During this experiment we will be making exposures to three ion/energy combinations. Each active detector will be given 2-4 hours of exposure time to each beam, depending on the number of participants and the condition of the beam. As in previous ICCHIBAN experiments, passive dosimeters will be exposed as a group and we will conduct both known and blind exposures for the passive dosimeters.


1. Selection of Heavy Ions:

The NSRL committee responsible for allocation of research beam time has generously given us the opportunity to make exposures to three heavy ion beams during the NSRL ICCHIBAN experiment. We have been given a 24 hours of beam time for each beam. The beams are: 1) 1 GeV/n 56Fe, 1  GeV 1H, and 1 GeV/n 16O.  The nominal characteristics of these heavy ion/energy combinations are given in the table below.  

Table 1. Nominal characteristics of heavy ion beams for the NSRL ICCHIBAN Experiment.

Ion

Energy (GeV/n)

b

Range in H2O (cm)

LET¥H2O (keV/mm)

1H

1

0.875

329.0

0.22

16O

1

0.875

82.2

13.8

56Fe

1

0.875

27.2

146.2

 
2. Exposure Plan

2.1 Active Detectors

Depending on the number of participants and the available beam time, each active detector will be allocated 2-4 hours of exposure time to each of the three heavy ion beams. We will expose the active detectors under several conditions: 1) direct, 2) inclined, and 3) behind absorber. These exposure conditions will depend on the available beam time for each detector.

2.1.1 Direct Beams

For the first exposure, each active detector will be irradiated to the direct beam. The beam intensity will be tuned to several hundred particles per cm2 per second (or spill) to avoid signal pile up. The beam size will be 310 cm in diameter so that the whole of the sensitive area of each detector will be irradiated.

2.1.2 Inclined Beams

Each detector will be rotated and irradiated to beams of non-normal incidence. The exposure angles will be 30°, 45°, and 60°. Because some of the detectors (i.e. silicon telescopes) have no sensitivity at large angles, there is the possibility that some of these inclined exposures will not be carried out.

2.1.3 Behind Absorber

If there is sufficient time, the active detectors will be exposed behind a thick absorber of known composition and depth. The purpose of these exposures  is to change the beam energy and to see secondary fragment particles. The material will be aluminum and the thickness will be determined for each ion/energy in the near future.


2.2 Passive Dosimeters

For passive dosimeters, we will be carrying out two types of exposure: 1) known, and 2) blind. The known exposures are detailed below and each investigator will have full information concerning the known exposures immediately following the run. Conditions for the blind exposures will be somewhat different from the known exposures and details of the blind exposures will not be made known to the participants until after they have read out their detectors are reported their results.

2.2.1 Known Exposures:

For each ion/energy we will be conduction four known exposures. Two known exposures are designed for TLD/OSL and two are designed for CR-39 PNTD. Details for the four known exposures to each ion/energy are given in the table below.

Table 2. Known Exposures for Passive Detectors.

Exposure

Dose/Fluence

Condition

1

50 mGy

Bare Beam for TLD/OSL Efficiency

2

5000 cm-2*

Bare Beam for CR-39 PNTD calibration

3

50 mGy

Behind Al absorber for TLD/OSL

4

5000 cm-2*

Behind Al absorber for CR-39 PNTD

*108 cm-2 for 1H exposures

For those research groups using only one type of detector (i.e. either TLD/OSL or CR-39 PNTD) you need prepare dosimeter packages for only two of the known exposures to each ion/energy (6 total known dosimeter packages). For those research groups using a combination of the two detectors types, we suggest you prepare sufficient detectors for all known exposures to each ion/energy (12 total known dosimeter packages).

2.2.2 Blind Exposures

In addition to the known exposures, there will be 4 blind exposures. As in previous ICCHIBAN experiments, the blind exposures may include a combination of several heavy ions at different doses or the detectors may be exposed behind some shielding of unknown composition and thickness. Each investigator needs to provide 4 detector packages for the blind exposures and each detector package must include a total compliment of detector types (i.e. for those groups using both TLD/OSL and CR-39 PNTD, both types of detector should be included in each detector package).

2.2.3 Totals:

For laboratories using only one type of detector, each participant needs to provide us with a total of 10 detector packages, not including controls. This will consist of 6 detector packages for the known exposures and 4 detector packages for the blind exposures.

For laboratories using both types of detector, each participant needs to provide us with a total of 16 detector packages, not including controls. This will consist of 12 detector packages for the known exposures and 4 detector packages for the blind exposures.


 3. Detector Details

3.1 Active Detectors

For research groups who have not participated in previous ICCHIBAN experiments with their active detectors or who have made major changes to the configuration/specifications of your detector, please fill out the inquiry form at the end of this document and return it to Yukio Uchihori. We especially need to know if you plan to monitor your detector during the exposures. Please inform us of which cables or connectors will be required. Many BNC and SHV cables are available, but we have to confirm other special cables if needed. Also, if you need a video camera to watch your detector during exposure, please let us know.

In addition, maximum speed of data taking system (or dead time) is important to tune beam intensity for each detector.

3.2. Passive Detector Packages

We expect that each investigator group will provide us with their detectors mounted in what we are calling “detector packages”. These might be comprised of arrays of TLDs, stacks of CR-39 PNTD, etc. If you have not previously filled out the inquiry form at the back of this document describing the size and contents of your detector packages, please do so and return it to Yukio Uchihori. For all other participants, we assume that you will be exposing detector packages of the same size and type as used in ICCHIBAN-2 and/or ?4.

Be advised that the passive detector packages are attached by adhesive tape to a vertical stand for irradiation. In previous ICCHIBAN experiments, some laboratories provided detector packages that were not flat on the back. This made it difficult to attached the detector packages to the acrylic exposure stand and may also have led to non-normal (non-90°) exposures. We recommend that the back surfaces of each detector package be flat so that they may be easily positioned and secured on the exposure stand.

We are using a labeling convention similar to that used in the ICCHIBAN-6 experiment. Please label your detector packages following the convention shown in Figure 1. These labels can be printed on adhesive label material, plain paper, or hand written. Two examples of labels are shown in Figure 2. The labels should be affixed to the front of each dosimeter package, i.e. the side of the dosimeter package facing the incident beam. Those detector packages that are not labeled properly may be subject to unknown influences.

NSRL ICCHIBAN, 25-28 Sept 2004
Institute Name (investigator name optional)
Energy/Ion (Blind), Nominal Dose
Detector No.
Your Identifier (optional)

Figure 1. Convention for labeling detector packages for the NSRL ICCHIBAN experiment.

NSRL ICCHIBAN, 25-28 Sept 2004
NASA Johnson Space Center/Semones
1 GeV/n Fe, 50 mGy
Known #1
9-Fe

NSRL ICCHIBAN, 25-28 Sept 2004
IMBP/Akatov
Blind
Blind #1
Mendeleev 40°

Figure 2. Examples of two labels for dosimeter packages to be irradiated during the ICCHIBAN-6 Experiment.


4. Beam Characterization and Monitoring

The actual energy of the beam will at the target (detector) will be determined by measuring a Bragg curve using a binary filter for each heavy ion beam. During the actual exposures, dose will be measured using either a calibrated scintillator or ion chamber. The Bragg curve data, resulting actual beam characteristics, and dose or fluence for each exposure will be provided to each investigator following the run. Each beam will also be characterized using the LBNL particle spectrometer.


5. Contact Information

For questions/comments regarding participation in NSRL ICCHIBAN, please contact either Yukio Uchihori, Eric Benton and/or Jack Miller.

For those groups mailing detectors directly to NSRL, please send them to:

Dr. Eric Benton
c/o Dr. Adam Rusek
NSRL
Building 957
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Upton, NY 11973-5000
USA

Please send your detectors in time so that they arrive at least one week prior to the start of the NSRL ICCHIBAN Experiment.


6. Registration & Training at Brookhaven National Laboratory

For those who plan to travel to BNL and participate directly in the NSRL ICCHIBAN Experiment, there is a rather lengthy and involved (especially for non-US citizens) process of registration and training required for access to the NSRL facility. The steps involved in this process are described on the NSRL Website: http://www.bnl.gov/medical/NASA/LTSF.asp

Most important is to follow steps 1, 2, 4 and 8 at: http://www.bnl.gov/medical/NASA/Ten_Steps.asp

Please begin this process immediately. Be advised that a minimum of one working day is required to fulfill all the BNL safety training and testing prior to the start of the experiment.


7. Lodging and Transportation at Brookhaven National Laboratory

Information regarding lodging and transportation at BNL may be found at: http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/visitorsguide.html

We will send additional information regarding lodging and transportation to those participants who have informed us that they will be traveling to BNL for the NSRL ICCHIBAN experiment.







Inquiry for Participants in ICCHIBAN Experiments (Active Detectors)

1.

Name of Investigator

 

2.

Name of Laboratory

 

3.

Postal address of Investigator

 

4.

E-mail address of Investigator

 

5.

Name(s) of participating group member(s)

6.

Name of Instrument

 

7.

Active or Passive

 

8.

Quantity(s) measured (fluence, dose, dose equivalent, dose rate, etc.)

9.

Sensitive Range (in terms of LET, proton energy or other appropriate quantity)

10.

Sensitive Area of the detector

W:      mm, D:      mm

11.

Size of Instrument

W:      mm, D:      mm, H:      mm

12.

Mass of Instrument

      grams

13.

Required number of operators

14.

What electrical requirements are needed? (i.e. 220 V, 50 Hz, battery operated, etc.)

15.

Will NIM or CAMAC racks and modules be needed? If yes, what equipment specifically?

16.

What signals will be transferred from exposure room to measurement room?

(i.e. BNC cables for signals and SHV cables for high voltage or Ethernet.)

17.

Is there a need for special video cameras?

18.

Can signals be transferred to a central data acquisition system that also collects and stores other signals relating to the incident particles?
(If possible, WG will gather the signals from every detector and store them in same files for same trigger.)

1.        Please supply digitized photos and/or drawings/diagrams of instruments.
These should contain sufficient information to assist in placement and alignment

2.        Reprints of relevant publications and a list of publications pertaining to the instrument:


Inquiry for Participants in ICCHIBAN Experiments (Passive Detector)

1.

Name of Investigator

2.

Name of Laboratory

3.

Postal address of Investigator

4.

E-mail address of Investigator

5.

Name(s) of participating group member(s)

6.

Name of Instrument

7.

Quantity(s) measured (fluence, dose, dose equivalent, dose rate, dose equivalent rate, etc.)

8.

Sensitive Range (in terms of LET, proton energy or other appropriate quantity)

9.

Is it or are they packed in a box (package)?

If your answer for the above question #9 is “Yes”, please answer the below questions for the package. If you answer is “No”, please answer the questions for your each detector.

10.

Sensitive Area of the detector

W:      mm, D:      mm

11.

Size of Instrument

W:      mm, D:      mm, H:      mm

12.

Mass of Instrument

      grams

 

 

13.

If your answer for the above question #9 is “Yes”, please list the including in the package.

Material

Number

Size

Mass

Quantity(s) measured

14.

If your answer for the above question #9 is “Yes”, Please explain the structure of the package.

15.

Do you need any additional measurement before or after exposure?

1.        Please supply digitized photos and/or drawings/diagrams of instruments.
These should contain sufficient information to assist in placement and alignment

2.        Reprints of relevant publications and a list of publications pertaining to the instrument: